*spoilers and a rant*

Don’t read this if you haven’t read the whole Hunger Games series, and you plan to. Or you will be sad and angry. LIKE ME RIGHT NOW. -_____________-

 

I finished Mockingjay last night (well technically this morning. It was definitely after midnight…oops). And now I officially hate Suzanne Collins a lot. Like, a very large a lot. Like, a burning fiery passion. …ok, not that much. Just a lot. I mean…I understand the sense of power and pleasure it brings to kill a character. I understand how awesome it feels to destroy a character’s life. I get that! I’ve done it too! But what she did to Katniss is not ok. I’m sorry. Not. Ok. No, Katniss isn’t the best character out there, morally speaking. She’s pretty despicable. Yea, she definitely deserved at least half of what she got. But really? REALLY??

Finnick’s death is about where I started deciding I hate Collins. That was completely unnecessary. Completely. Then Prim…Ok. Never mind. Maybe I DO hate the author with a burning fiery passion…WHY? There was absolutely no reason for that, especially after Finnick! If she wanted to knock off someone close to Katniss, she should have chosen Gale. Seriously. Even though I liked him and still think Katniss should have married him instead of Peeta. -_- *never liked Peeta much* He was too wimpy. Or something. …though come the end, I didn’t like Gale too much either. Ok, so pretty much the only likeable characters Collins KILLED OFF.

And that’s another thing. The ending is like…not resolved. What happens to Gale? He goes to 2, but what does he DO? Is he sad that Katniss chooses Peeta? Does he ever fall in love with someone else? What? And what about Annie? How does she react to Finnick being gone? And when Katniss shoots Coin instead of Snow…WHAT HAPPENS?? There’s mass pandemonium, but that’s all they say! What was Coin going for? Did she just want to take Snow’s place and leave the Capitol as it was? Did she want to turn the Capitol into something nice and non-Hunger-Games-y? Why did she suggest a final Games? Once Katniss shot her, how did everyone else figure out what Coin did? Where did Coin get the hovercraft with the Capitol’s seal on the side? How come it was so easy for the Rebels to get to Snow’s mansion when Katniss and Co. had such an impossibly difficult time and lost half their numbers on the way? What happened to all the Capitol citizens who weren’t fighting? The innocent bystanders? Did they slaughter them like everyone else, or let them live in the new Capitol? What is the new Capitol like? WHAT HAPPENS?

I could go on.

But really. Why Prim? Rue I could understand, in the first book. Rue was good. She had to go. But Prim? Honestly? The one person who loved Katniss unconditionally and wasn’t trying to kill her? I mean, face it. Peeta tried to murder her several times (not his fault, but still). Gale basically hated her by the end because he was so jealous. Katniss’ mom like…was pretty much not even a part of her life. That leaves who who actually loves Katniss? …um…no one? And marrying the guy who tried to kill you several times is a little weird. Even if he does make a full recovery, which I still can’t believe he could have.

So. Suzanne Collins. If I ever meet you, I will not ask for an autographed copy of your books. I will either deck you for what you did to Katniss, or I will sit you down and make you explain your reasons for killing all the truly good characters and leaving the despicable ones alive. Probably the first.

 

…but, on a sort-of-good note, I haven’t cried so hard over a book in quite a few years. Not since the first time I read Christy

 

Darnit now I want to read the first one again. I’d forgotten how much the writing style captivates one…

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29 Comments Add yours

  1. taethiel says:

    Thank you. Thank you so, so much. Now I know I’m not out of my mind.

    Those are the exact thoughts that went through my head after I read that book. I felt like she didn’t know how to end it or what to do, so she just started killing people off and making everything horrible. *facepalm* I hated that book so much. And Catching Fire was so good, too! Everything could have been wonderful! But it… wasn’t. -_-

    Anyway. Thank you. My brother thinks I’m insane for hating that book. But now I know I’m not. …unless we’re both insane together. o.O Which isn’t an altogether unreasonable assumption… oh well. =D

    Like

    1. AnnaEstelle says:

      I honestly can’t really remember Catching Fire much…but I remember the ending was awesome and I was like WAIT NO WHAT HAPPENS? =P …but yea. You aren’t out of your mind. -__________- I liked the book…but the only reason I liked it is because of the writing style and the way I couldn’t put it down (thus the reading past midnight). I didn’t like the content at all. -___- Well…I did like it some up to the point where she killed Finnick. Then I was like, ok. I can’t even like you if I tried now. =P NOT a good ending. NOT good killing-people thing. -_________- Especially with Prim. That was completely not necessary.
      lol. We prolly are both crazy. But I’m good with that. *wonders what Luke thinks of it* he read it last year, I think…

      Like

      1. Jacob Cullum says:

        Hmm, I think you put it well, even though I wasn’t as upset at the ending as Rebekah or you. =P I think with all the deaths and destruction, she may have been trying to show the destructiveness of war. Maybe not, but I think that’s what she was trying to do at least. I do agree that she shouldn’t have killed off all those likable characters, though. One, maybe, but not all.

        And Peeta was great, in my opinion. He was the only one who actually didn’t compromise his principles. He said he didn’t want to be a part of the Capitol’s games, and he resisted them. And in Mockingjay he was drugged for half the time, but he was still fighting for Katniss’s good. In fact, he wanted them to kill him so he wouldn’t hurt Katniss (not the best request, but it shows his self sacrifice). Both Gale and Katniss let the Capitol harden and embitter them.

        So, yeah. The ending wasn’t well done, but it was decent.

        …And Mockingjay will be one bloody movie, unless the filmmakers change tons of things to implications. Which wouldn’t quite work.

        Like

      2. AnnaEstelle says:

        …oh goodness…in terms of movies…-_- don’t get me started on that either. I thought the first movie was awful. They seemed to just…leave out all the good messages and themes and lessons from the book, and turn it into a romance/killing-people-fest. I dun wanna even KNOW what they will do with Mockingjay.

        Like

    2. joctavianr says:

      As far as movies go, I think that the next movie will actually be quite good. The first one was mediocre. It captured the basics of everything but didn’t key in on anything to make it memorable or meaningful. It was somewhat underdeveloped but did manage to hit the basic main points and not stray too far off track or get too caught up in the romance. The previews for the next movie, however, seem to key in on all the behind the scenes things, the capitol’s agenda, Snow’s ideas, the meaning of the games, and all that. I think that the second movie will actually be quite good, if slightly darker.

      Like

  2. Dragonslayer says:

    . . . I disliked all three so much that I was just upset that EVERYONE didn’t die.

    Like

    1. Jacob Cullum says:

      Complete annihilation? =P

      Like

      1. Dragonslayer says:

        Yeah, well, I wasn’t that impressed with any of the three, to be honest.

        Like

  3. juliel1tps says:

    Yes. Oh yes. A girl after my own heart. *glares at hunger games* I can’t stand those books.

    Like

    1. AnnaEstelle says:

      …but see, I loved the first book. A lotttt. The second was pretty awesome too, if I remember correctly. It’s just the last one…that I am really, really mad at Collins for. -_- *glares flames* there was such potential, and then…with that ending…it just died. -_- LIKE ALL THE GOOD CHARACTERS.

      Like

  4. My name is Elizabeth Campbell, and I approve this message. *emphatic nod*
    I still can’t help kinda loving the series because, well, it’s awesome. But then Peeta when crazy. And Gale did some majorly inhumane things. And FINNICK AND PRIM DIED, FOR GOODNESS SAKE. Like you said, the story had potential; it’s thought-provoking and gets you out of your comfort zone (well, unless you’re just reading for the stupid romance. xP). But by the end, it fell flat as a pancake run over by a steamroller. Jussayin’. -.-

    Like

    1. AnnaEstelle says:

      “it’s thought-provoking and gets you out of your comfort zone”
      ^^What I liked so much about the first book. What the movie of said first book absolutely failed to convey. =P

      Like

  5. joctavianr says:

    Anna, the author was trying to portray cost. She was trying to introduce realism lest the major moral and political themes become obscured by the lighter side of the stories. Personally, I loved all three books, but I actually liked the second and third ones more. I thought they got progressively better as the author became more comfortable with working in philosophic and political messages into the storyline. I cannot remember the books all that clearly because I read them quite a while ago. However, I do remember that Prim died for several purposes in the author’s themes and political messages. This post really bummed me out.

    Like

    1. AnnaEstelle says:

      Haha. I’m sorry I bummed you out. =P And I understand what you’re saying…but I still feel like there were a lot of questions unresolved at the end. And while I see what you’re saying about Prim dying, I feel like the author was just kind of…rushing an ending. I guess I don’t really catch on to the political themes nearly as much, since my knowledge of politics is microscopic at best. I am really glad that the “lighter side of the story” wasn’t allowed to dominate in the end, though. There was really only a very short “happy ending,” and it wasn’t even completely happy, as Katniss reflects on the permanent damage the wars did and will continue to do on her and her children. I think if it had all ended well, and all the good people lived, it would definitely lose a lot of the power it has. But I also still feel like some of the deaths were more because an end had to happen at some point, and killing a bunch of the characters made that happen easier.

      So, while I totally get what you’re saying and even agree with most of it, also there’s the very, very large part of me that says this is horrible, and I don’t want to hear or see or live it in my head, and so much excruciating horror happening to one person is not necessary and not something that should ever, ever be tolerated, and why does Katniss’ sister have to die in such a way when she’s pretty much the only one left who understands who Katniss is and loves her anyway and thinks that she can move beyond her worse side, and why does Finnick have to die when he’s the only one who saw what enormous internal suffering Katniss was in and helped her move beyond it and keep functioning and do what she needed to do.

      So, I guess it’s not that I dislike what Collins did with her themes and lessons and all that…that was good. I guess I more just dislike the way she chose to portray those things. And though the realism she brought in with all the deaths at the end was good and necessary for a well-written book, I hate it. I never have liked reality much, and think I will probably always prefer my fantasy world. So when something like that suddenly intrudes upon that fantasy world, my entire being revolts.

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    2. taethiel says:

      ^ ^ ^ What Anna said.

      I felt like the story had so much potential leading into the third book, and even partway through the third book. But about midway, it just started going majorly downhill. It seemed to go beyond portraying the costs of revolution and war and the corruption of human nature – Collins either didn’t know what to do, or she knew exactly what she was doing. She either killed everyone off to make an end (like Anna said), or she has a completely hopeless view of mankind and all efforts to rebel against tyranny. Because, in the end, the rebels were the same as those they were rebelling against. They didn’t even set up a new system of government – there was just a new president, apparently with the assumption that this one wouldn’t be corrupt like the last, which seems to directly contradict Collins’ assessment of human nature. There was not a spark of good or happiness left in the world by the end.
      I do think she could have portrayed the costs of revolution well… but she should have provided some hope. Prim’s death and Katniss’ agreeing to a hunger games for the children of the defeated were the two events that cemented my hatred of the book. The world was wrong, and there was nothing left to make it right. It seemed like the message of the book was, There is no hope. And I’m sorry, I just can’t take that as an answer.

      *ahem* Anywayyyy. =P

      And seriously. Finnick? And Prim?? Just no. No, no, no. By the time Prim died, there was no point left. Gale had turned heartless. Coin was as bad as Snow. Finnick, the only good character left, was dead. Katniss had become what she was trying to defeat, because she let hatred overpower her. Did you really have to kill Prim on top of all of that? Collins had already gotten the message across.

      *shrugs* Justmytwocents. =P

      Like

      1. AnnaEstelle says:

        *agrees with everything Rebekah just said*
        “The world was wrong, and there was nothing left to make it right. It seemed like the message of the book was, There is no hope. And I’m sorry, I just can’t take that as an answer.”
        yes. this.

        Like

  6. mariertps says:

    *Is completely on your side* THEY MADE her marry Peeta???? Of all the low-down, dirty, nasty, despicable, rotten . . . -.- That was a terrible ending. Terrible lessons. No questions answered. And Katniss sort of needed a gigantic slap in the face for being so self-centered, but the slaughtering was overkill. 0=} I iz done ranting. I’m just grouchy because my poor little wisdom tooth left today.

    Like

    1. Jacob Cullum says:

      You got your wisdom teeth taken out today? Ouch. =P

      Like

      1. mariertps says:

        Well just one, but yeah. -.- I hurt lol, it was a nasty experience. Poor John had four taken out . . .

        Like

  7. joctavianr says:

    People on here are mentioning Katniss’s character flaws as a bad thing. However, I found them to be one of the better aspects of the book. The author created a compelling, flawed protagonist and showed all her negative character traits without glorifying them. You are never left, throughout the whole series, feeling like Katniss is a perfect person or dismissing her flaws. They are woven into the story and show especially well in how she hates herself more the more other people praise her. That battle with self I found quite interesting. I think that you were supposed to want to slap Katniss in the face a lot of the time. That was intentional.
    Personally, I think that it was a good ending for her to marry Peeta. Gale started off as my favorite character. However, his low esteem for life allowed him to become bitter and to lose sight of the very things he should have protected while fighting the capitol. (the value of life).
    Peeta, on the other hand, while damaged goods, never lost sight of what was right and what was wrong. He never gave up on ideals, while Gale and Katniss both at times did. He was not my favorite character because he was kind of weak-willed. However, he did retain a degree of innocence throughout the series. Gale, on the other hand, ended up a shattered shell of the idealist he had been, full of anger and bitterness without a care for the ideals he should have valued. Because Katniss also was bitter and vengeful, I think that she needed Peeta’s kindness rather than Gale’s strength. =)

    Like

    1. taethiel says:

      I completely agree with you about Katniss and Peeta, whatever else I may disagree on. ;) Peeta was the one individual who throughout the revolution never let himself be twisted into a mirror image of his enemies. Katniss hated them so much that she became them, in a sense. But Peeta didn’t.

      Like

    2. AnnaEstelle says:

      I agree with everything you just said, Justin. The fact that Katniss wasn’t an idealized, perfect person is part of what made the books so good. And the kind-of changing/twisting of Gale’s character was well-done. I’m glad Katniss stuck with Peeta. …but I still don’t like Peeta a whole lot. hehe XD

      Like

      1. mariertps says:

        I still don’t like her xD I could have done with her self-centeredness. Even Peeta and Gale said that she was self-centered. “Katniss will pick whoever she thinks she can’t survive without.” Chapter 23, last line.

        Like

  8. Lulu says:

    Thats real life man. Real life isn’t a happy ending. People die, things get messed up, thats the way it goes. I like Collins for that, for portraying real life during a huge civil war.

    Like

  9. Tiberius Shift says:

    YEHA ANNA BECAME A TRIBUTE OKAY DANCE PARTY WAHOO. ALLONS-Y!!!!!!!!!!!!!! HONESTLY YES. Wat is air. I can’t. I have lost the ability to can. hELP. AND YES WE ALL HATE THOSE DEATHS. Thank you. Dear gods of olympus yes.

    Like

    1. AnnaEstelle says:

      …you have lost the ability to…can…? Like…the dance? You can-can-ed? That’s disturbing…
      *grins at you* O=)

      Like

      1. Tiberius Shift says:

        -_-

        Like

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